Wednesday, August 02, 2006

Acting in the Digital Age

Posted by Jabawacefti

This may be better posted by Scott, but I saw it and couldn't resist. Acting looks to be different in the digital age. Love this paragraph:

Even better, the director doesn't have to make all the important decisions up front. They can apply "makeup" in post production. Rather than build the perfect period-piece set, they can shoot in the real world and age it afterward. For one movie set in the 1970s, one of the panelists said, "We shot on real streets and then spent a half-million dollars erasing Starbucks from every fucking shot."

3 Comments:

At 2:52 PM, Blogger Scott Roche said...

See here's the thing though. Film might be moreexpensive, but there's so much infrastructure that you need when shooting digital I have to ask if it's really cheaper. It's cooler sure and when directors get used to it it'll be a grand thing. My favorite quote, "The great thing is that a director can keep changing things until he gets what he wants. The bad thing, of course, is that a director can keep changing things until he gets what he wants."

 
At 3:04 PM, Blogger Jabawacefti said...

Yeah, that sort of reminds me of the whole electronic filing thing they have for federal court practice. The good part is that you can just scan anything in and file it at midnight. The bad part is that you can just scan anything in and file it at midnight.

 
At 3:10 PM, Blogger codemorse said...

Digital is like any other tool. It depends on how you use it.

There's a lot to be said for having more control over the world you create on film. Need snow? Why wait for it or manufacture it when you can paint it in?

The downside, as Jabs notes, is that it leads to over-use. Look at CGI. Definately in the first few years where CG exploded, there was ridiculous over-usage, even when it was clear that the effects would have looked better and been cheaper in practical FX.

It's also the bane of film historians and afficianados. Spielberg's changing Government guns to walkee-talkees in E.T. is tantamount to sacrilege as far as I'm concerned.

Digital directing opens up all sorts of possibilities. It's up to the filmmakers to explore those possibilities well or poorly.

 

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